'Black Panther' is inspiring, expansive, and the best Marvel origin story yet

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The first critic reviews have been released online this morning and it's safe to say that there is a positive word of mouth surrounding the critics.

Do you plan to see Black Panther? .

The Marvel movie Black Panther, which is released next Tuesday in the United Kingdom, is about to put paid to the myth that black superheroes do not succeed at the box office, in the same way that Wonder Woman zapped the idea that female superheroes are a financial curse. The film might, arguably, be the most universally accepted movie among the Black community that, exhausted of white savior flicks, slave narratives, and stereotypical depictions, feels we're finally getting the representation we've been craving on the big screen.

When middle schoolers at Ron Clark Academy in Atlanta found out they were going to see the "Black Panther" on Friday, they erupted into dancing to an instrumental from the "Black Panther" soundtrack in a now-viral video on Twitter.

Like Wonder Woman, moreover, the Black Panther/T'Challa (Chadwick Boseman), the leader of the fictional African nation Wakanda, is not only super, but royalty, about to ascend the throne that he has inherited from his father.

The average rating for Black Panther right now is an 8.6/10, while Thor: Ragnarok's score was 7.5/10 and Spider-Man: Homecoming's score was 7.7/10 in comparison. Black Panther is about the internal struggle of mighty Wakanda over what to do about the people struggling all over the rest of the world.

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Alongside Boseman, the film boasts the likes of Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong'o, Forest Whitaker, Letitia Wright, Angela Bassett, Danai Gurira, Angela Bassett, and Daniel Kaluuya. Click through to see the hopes, dreams, and gratitude resting on director and co-writer Ryan Coogler's shoulders with this film and tell us what Black Panther means to you.

It's a massive accomplishment done on an incredible scale, given the many tribes we get a glimpse of in Wakanda.

"There was a time period where people would ask me questions about whether or not an audience could sit through a movie with a lead character that spoke with that accent", Boseman said of the east African inflection he gives the superhero - alias King T'Challa. Whereas, in our film that character is just settling in.

Inspired by the comic-book character first introduced in 1966, Black Panther continues the adventures of Wakanda King T'Challa (first introduced onscreen in Captain America: Civil War) as he battles a conspiracy to destroy his homeland and attempts to stop a world war.

"When Black Panther works, it's thrillingly alive". Its themes including the importance of a wealthy nation taking on responsibility for the betterment of the whole world especially hit home for me in the Trumpian age of America First.

An infamous arms dealer, Ulysses Klaue (Andy Serkis), has somehow got his grubby hands on some vibranium, and has every intention to sell it to the highest bidder on the black market. We understand who he his and exactly what he wants.

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