Moderate coffee drinking could be good for you, says new research

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Dr Robin Poole of the University of Southampton, who led the research, said coffee was "more likely to benefit health than harm".

These benefits Include lower risks of liver disease, Diabetes, dementia and some cancers.

The study said: "Coffee consumption was more often associated with benefit than harm for a range of health outcomes across exposures including high versus low, any versus none, and one extra cup a day".

Earlier studies have suggested beneficial links between coffee drinking and liver disease.

They caution pregnant women and women at high risk of fractures should limit their coffee consumption. And this study is significant because while lower risks of liver disease, cancer, and stroke had been posited in the past, researchers had not been able to pinpoint coffee as the cause. And, if you combined all of the research done on coffee and pooled together all of their conclusions, what would be the verdict?

Reassuringly, harms were not apparent apart from during pregnancy when coffee drinking was linked to low birth weight, premature birth (in the first six months of pregnancy) and miscarriage. The latest study builds on that research but calls for more randomised controlled trials to further understand the correlation.

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Contrasted and non-coffee consumers, the individuals who drank around some coffee daily seemed to diminish their danger of getting heart issues or passing on from them. But liver diseases stood out as having the greatest benefit compared with other conditions.

New analysis shows the popular beverage is associated with a lower risk of death with the largest reduction in risk coming from three cups a day.

"The evidence is so robust and consistent across studies and health outcomes, however, that we can be reassured that drinking coffee is generally safe", he continues. "Should doctors recommend drinking coffee to prevent disease?" Evidence in the review came mainly from observational research, so we can't extrapolate our findings to suggest people start drinking coffee or increasing their intake in attempts to become healthier.

"Factors such as age, whether people smoked or not and how much exercise they took could all have had an effect", Professor Paul Roderick, co-author of the study, told BBC.

Finally, Guallar cautions that drinking coffee is sometimes linked with less healthful habits, such as eating sugary cakes or other fatty products.

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